Tag Archives: National Defense Authorization Act

Virginia Nullifies NDAA provisions in defense of US and VA Constitutions

By Carl Herman
Activist Post

Virginia’s Senate voted today (39-1) to nullify NDAA 2012 provisions to seize American citizens at the dictate of the federal executive branch. They joined the House’s 96-4 vote.

Do an Internet news search for this story (like this); you won’t find any corporate media coverage. This is what Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld meant with Information Operations Road Map (specifically with endnote 76 in an article on the also non-covered Martin Luther King civil trial that found the US government guilty of assassinating Dr. King), and what CIA-disclosed Operation Mockingbird was meant to achieve: no corporate media opposition.

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Before there was indefinite detention, there was Conspiracy Theory (video)

By Goodman Green
BrasscheckTV

Over a year before we heard anything about the National Defense Authorization Act having provisions that codify the indefinite detention of American citizens without trial, over a year before we heard anything about the “activation” of FEMA camps nation-wide, Jesse Ventura told us all about it on his TV show, Conspiracy Theory.

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Democrats and the McCarthyite attack on detainee lawyers

By Glenn Greenwald
Salon

(updated below – Update II – Update III) 

Over at Balkinization, Law Professor Steve Vladeck has done a superb job highlighting a truly vile provision in the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2011, which directs the Pentagon’s Inspector General to “conduct an investigation of the conduct and practices of lawyers” who have represented Guantanamo detainees and then report back to Congress.  That provision is the brainchild of GOP Rep. Jeff Miller of Florida, who has labeled efforts to represent detainees (specifically as part of the John Adams Project) a “treacherous enterprise” and smeared those lawyers as “disloyal.”  Vladeck thoroughly documents how the lawyer conduct that is targeted by the mandated investigation is so broad that it could easily encompass every act of defending Guantanamo detainees, and thus, standing alone, could serve to intimidate and deter lawyers from vigorously representing those detainees in the future.   

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