Tag Archives: bp disaster

USA-Cuba: Drilling the embargo

By Bob Row

One side-effect of the BP oil spill disaster in the Gulf may be a more pragmatic approach to Cuba by the Obama administration. As this article points out, American officials are yet in “working-level discussions” with the Cuban government about the oil spill.

But, beyond the present hour urgencies, there are long term issues at stake. Cuba is about to explore its off-shore oil reserves in the North Basin right in front of the Florida coastal shores with the help of Spanish, Chinese, Brazilian and Norwegian technologies. Suddenly, the American government realizes that they are isolated by virtue of the embargo policy and lack a word in a risky ongoing development concerning a mayor economic place.

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Did the BP oil well really blow out in February?


Washington’s Blog

The Deepwater Horizon blew up on April 20th, and sank a couple of days later. BP has been criticized for failing to report on the seriousness of the blow out for several weeks.

However, as a whistleblower previously told 60 Minutes, there was an accident at the rig a month or more prior to the April 20th explosion:

[Mike Williams, the chief electronics technician on the Deepwater Horizon, and one of the last workers to leave the doomed rig] said they were told it would take 21 days; according to him, it actually took six weeks.

With the schedule slipping, Williams says a BP manager ordered a faster pace.

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Cultural Extinction: Louisiana’s Coastal Communities Fear They May Never Recover

By Jordan Flaherty
Black Agenda Report

Even before the latest catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico, Big Energy had laid waste to Black and Native American communities along the coast. At least five all-Black towns were wiped from the face of the earth by corporate pollution, and the last redoubt of the Pointe-au-Chien tribe is under petrochemical assault. “It doesn’t matter how much money they give you, if we don’t have our shrimp, fish, crabs and oysters,” said one bayou native.

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