Tag Archives: cables

Leaked U.S. Embassy Cables Document Efforts to Counter SOA Watch

By Lisa Sullivan
SOA Watch

WikiLeaks, the whistle-blower website that has published thousands of classified diplomatic cables, has posted two cables from the U.S. embassy in Costa Rica, that offer insight into the U.S. pressure tactics to keep the SOA/ WHINSEC in business.

Read the cables here:
Cable 1: http://213.251.145.96/cable/2007/11/07SANJOSE1999.html
Cable 2:http://213.251.145.96/cable/2007/12/07SANJOSE2073.html

When we join together as small grassroots groups from around the Americas to resist militarization and promote a culture of peace we are, quite simply, very powerful. So much so, that the world’s largest military giant not only takes notice, but sometimes has to scramble to keep up as we take the lead.

Just days ago, Wikileaks revealed cables from the US embassy in Costa Rica that unveil an all-out six-month campaign by the embassy, in conjunction with the Pentagon’s Southcom and SOA/WHINSEC to subvert one of SOA Watch’s major strategies: the appeal to governments to withdraw their troops and police from SOA/WHINSEC.

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Bradley Manning charged with 22 crimes including capital offense ‘Aiding the Enemy’

Faces 22 additional charges, including capitol offense for aiding the enemy

Statements by Manning’s lawyer and by WikiLeaks follows this Wired report. ~Ed.

By Kim Zetter
Wired

The Army has filed 22 new charges against suspected WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning, among them a capital offense for which the government said it would not seek the death penalty. The charges, filed Tuesday but disclosed only Wednesday, include aiding the enemy, theft of public property or records, computer fraud, transmitting defense information and wrongfully causing intelligence to be published on the internet knowing it would be accessible to the enemy. The aiding the enemy charge is a capital offense which potentially carries the death penalty.

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Spain’s largest newspaper on WikiLeaks, Madrid cables

Why EL PAÍS chose to publish the leaks

By Javier Moreno
El Pais, Dec. 23, 2010

1. The leak and its consequences.

When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange called my cellphone on a Friday afternoon in November, I could barely hear him. The conversation, held amid the usual tumult of Rome’s airport on a weekend, was strangely short. Assange talked slowly, making sure to pronounce each word carefully, his deep, almost baritone voice, reducing itself almost to a whisper at the end of each sentence. A few moments before the conversation, I had noticed how the Italian police seemed particularly interested in the little luggage that I was carrying, and that as the phone had rung, they were examining the cloth that I had used to wipe the screen of my iPad. Were they looking for drugs, or explosives, or both?

Assange, as far as I could tell at that time, was willing to give EL PAÍS access to 250,000 cablegrams sent between the US State Department and its embassies in around 30 countries, garnered as a result of the largest leak of secret documents in history.

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