Tag Archives: coal ash

Clock Is Ticking on Cleaning up Coal Ash

Coal ash is contaminating drinking water supplies in the U.S., and it is only getting worse as the waste stream grows in volume and toxicity. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency made it official on June 21, giving the public only a short period to comment on the first-ever federal rule for coal ash disposal at hundreds of dumps and landfills across the country.

The environmental group Earth Justice is trying to get 50,000 emails sent to the EPA telling them to set strong, federally enforceable safeguards against this hazardous waste.

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Coal Ash Dump Sites Polluting Drinking Water across US with Heavy Metals and Arsenic

Kingston TN coal ash spill 2008

By Paul Napoli
The Injury Board

A new study has identified 39 additional coal ash dumpsites in 21 states that are contaminating water supplies with heavy metals, showing the government is inadequately monitoring these disposal sites and lax at regulating the toxic waste. The study is entitled IN HARM’S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans and Their Environment and was released just days before the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) starts a series of hearings across the U.S. to consider regulation of toxic coal ash waste.

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Obama’s Regulatory Czar Deliberately Stalling Toxic Coal Waste Regulation

(Image: Jared Rodriguez / t r u t h o u t; Adapted: GregPC, Robert Thomson, calebkimbrough)

By Joshua Frank
TruthOut

It may be unsettling to some that the man most responsible for overseeing coal ash regulation within the Obama administration has a track record of siding with polluters instead of the people most affected by toxic waste.

His name is Cass Sunstein and he serves as the little known, yet powerful administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs – aka Obama’s “regulatory czar.” A long-time friend of the president, Sunstein’s law and academic career, which include stints at Harvard and University of Chicago, has focused largely on regulatory policy and behavioral economics. Sunstein, who has written extensively on such matters, has challenged workplace safety laws and even the constitutionality of the Clean Air Act. Continue reading