Tag Archives: Natural GAs

Down the Drain Goes Public’s Right to Know about Fracking

BC gov’t ignores own pledge to consult citizens, grants Talisman’s request for big water use

By Ben Parfitt
The Tyee

Williston ReservoirWilliston Reservoir in northeast B.C. is the province’s biggest body of fresh water. Photo: BC Hydro.

What landed in the Tyee’s inbox was entirely in keeping with the government’s handling of a contentious proposal by a natural gas company to divert large quantities of water out of Williston Reservoir. When word leaked that the government had approved the diversion scheme, a rather strange statement was issued that began by noting that the provincial Cabinet minister in charge was unavailable.

The statement was not a formal news release. Nor was it posted on any government website. Rather, it was emailed without advance notice to a few select media — The Tyee and CBC Radio’s Prince George station included.

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Ohio House passes bill to open parks to fracking: Stop it in the Senate

By Alex Beauchamp
Food & Water Watch

Last week the Ohio House of Representatives passed a bill that would allow hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”, in our state parks. This risky drilling process will turn our pristine state parks into industrial parks, but we’ve got a chance to stop it in the state Senate. Can you contact your state senator today?

What will drilling in state parks mean for you? It could be devastating for Ohio’s drinking water.

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PA faces $4 billion dollar deficit; refuses to tax gas frackers

This is part 2 of TRNN’s coverage of the corporate takeover of Pennsylvania’s natural gas reserves. Today, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported on Governor-elect Tom Corbett: “Coming into the job in January, the Republican prosecutor-turned-governor will immediately have to tackle an estimated $4 billion deficit. And because he made a no-tax pledge during his campaign, he will have to do so primarily by slashing spending.”

Free Gas in Pennsylvania?

By Jesse Freeston and Malak Behrouznami
The Real News Network

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A Colossal Fracking Mess

By Christopher Bateman
(Photographs by Jacques del Conte)
Vanity Fair

A shale-gas drilling and fracking site in Dimock, Pennsylvania.

Early on a spring morning in the town of Damascus, in northeastern Pennsylvania, the fog on the Delaware River rises to form a mist that hangs above the tree-covered hills on either side. A buzzard swoops in from the northern hills to join a flock ensconced in an evergreen on the river’s southern bank.

Stretching some 400 miles, the Delaware is one of the cleanest free-flowing rivers in the United States, home to some of the best fly-fishing in the country. More than 15 million people, including residents of New York City and Philadelphia, get their water from its pristine watershed. To regard its unspoiled beauty on a spring morning, you might be led to believe that the river is safely off limits from the destructive effects of industrialization. Unfortunately, you’d be mistaken. The Delaware is now the most endangered river in the country, according to the conservation group American Rivers.

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Film Challenges Safety Of U.S. Shale Gas Drilling

Edith Honan   Reuters June 18. 2010

A new documentary purporting to expose the hazards of onshore natural gas drilling illustrates its point with startling images of people setting fire to water flowing from faucets in their homes.

“GasLand,” which premiers on cable’s HBO on June 21, fuels the debate over shale gas and the extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing, which involves blasting millions of gallons of water, sand and diluted chemicals into shale rock, breaking it apart to free the gas.

It comes at a time of heightened environmental awareness and scrutiny of the energy industry due to the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.

Advocates promote shale gas as an abundant and relatively clean source of energy within the United States but critics including “GasLand” director Josh Fox assert there are environmental and health risks.

Fox, a Pennsylvania playwright, calls the industry’s contention that such drilling is harmless too good to be true. He started asking questions about when his family was offered $100,000 plus royalties to allow hydraulic fracturing, also known as “fracking,” on their property.

“I don’t think it’s a gold mine. I think it’s a trap,” Fox said. He turned down the offer but many neighbors took the money.

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