Tag Archives: Rule of Law

5 Ways DHS Violates the Constitution with Website Domain Seizures

By David Makarewicz
Activist Post

Last week, Bryan McCarthy, the 32 year old operator of ChannelSurfing.net, was arrested on charges of criminal copyright infringement.  ChannelSurfing.net was one of the streaming sports sites that had its domain seized by federal authorities shortly before the Super Bowl as part of the “In Our Sites” program, run by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).  Prior to the seizure, McCarthy reportedly made more than $90,000 from advertisements on his site.

This arrest has once again raised questions about the In Our Sites program, in which the Government has seized thousands of domains accused, but not convicted, of copyright infringement, illegal streaming of sporting events, selling black market goods and distributing child pornography.  Critics ranging from bloggers to individual rights advocates to Senators have questioned the constitutionality of these seizures.

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House Stealing: Tickerguy’s Perspective

By Karl Denninger
The Market Ticker

Most of you have probably heard by now about the family that was foreclosed on in California, their home was resold, refurbished, and they then effectively “stole it back” with their attorney and a locksmith breaking in and re-taking possession.

Conejo Capital Partners has published “the other side of the story”, and it makes several good points – some of which I believe deserve exposition and discussion:

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The case Liz Cheney doesn’t want you to read about

Innocent man helped by Gitmo Attorney: the case Liz Cheney doesn’t want you to read about

By Conor Friedersdorf
True/Slant

Every so often, 42-year-old Fouad al-Rabiah took leave from his four kids and a longtime desk job at Kuwait Airways to help those less fortunate than him. In 1994 he did relief work in Bosnia. He spent part of 1998 working with the Red Cross in Kosovo. In 2000 he flew to Bangladesh, where he helped deliver dialysis fluid to hospitals. And in 2001, he traveled to Afghanistan, intending to provide humanitarian relief when he wound up in the custody of the United States military. In that chaotic year, our troops came across lots of foreigners in Afghanistan, some of them traveling abroad for entirely innocent reasons, others engaged in jihad against the American war effort.

It took until the summer of 2002 for Mr. al-Rabiah to be visited by a CIA analyst and Arabic expert. “He wasn’t a jihadi, but I told him he should have been arrested for stupidity,” the CIA agent told New Yorker reporter Jane Mayer in an interview. Ms. Mayer’s book The Dark Side goes on to explain that two National Security Council staffers — senior terrorism expert General John Gordon, and legal adviser John Bellinger — sought to brief President Bush about reports that an innocent man was being held at Guantanamo Bay. Before they could reach President Bush, however, they were intercepted by David Addington, legal counsel to vice-president Dick Cheney, who said, “No, there will be no review. The President has determined that they are ALL enemy combatants. We are not going to revisit it!”

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Unitary Executive can OK mass murder: John Yoo

I have thought for some time that the role model adopted by the US government more and more resembles the Mafia.  The Insurance Industry has also followed this extortionate path. And now we hear assertions that any US president may target an American for death, and John Yoo (of torture memo fame) additionally claims that a sitting president is entitled to order massacres at will.

The City on the Hill has become the Mob.

Claudia

Yoo Called Civilian Slaughter OK

By Jason Leopold         ConsortiumNews.com February 20, 2010

Former Justice Department lawyer John Yoo argued that President George W. Bush’s commander-in-chief powers were so sweeping that he could willfully order the massacre of civilians, yet Yoo’s culpability in Bush administration abuses was deemed “poor judgment,” not a violation of “professional standards.”

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