Tag Archives: troy davis

Declaration of the Occupation of New York City

By New York City General Assembly

This document was accepted by the NYC General Assembly on September 29, 2011:

As we gather together in solidarity to express a feeling of mass injustice, we must not lose sight of what brought us together. We write so that all people who feel wronged by the corporate forces of the world can know that we are your allies.

As one people, united, we acknowledge the reality: that the future of the human race requires the cooperation of its members; that our system must protect our rights, and upon corruption of that system, it is up to the individuals to protect their own rights, and those of their neighbors; that a democratic government derives its just power from the people, but corporations do not seek consent to extract wealth from the people and the Earth; and that no true democracy is attainable when the process is determined by economic power. We come to you at a time when corporations, which place profit over people, self-interest over justice, and oppression over equality, run our governments. We have peaceably assembled here, as is our right, to let these facts be known.

Continue reading

From Barbarism to Barbarism: Libya, Troy Davis, Abu Ghraib

By Cynthia McKinney
Global Research

After Georgia was forced by the United States Supreme Court to abandon its scheme to deny Black people the right to an undiluted vote and representation, Leroy Johnson became the first Black person elected to the Georgia State Senate since Reconstruction. The year was 1962. During his tenure, Johnson used his considerable influence inside the body to become the Senate’s Chair of the Judiciary Committee. From this position, he was able to bottle-up legislation that was bad for the State of Georgia, especially its Black residents. Outside and inside the State Senate, Leroy Johnson practiced the art of leadership and engaged in the fight for justice. He produced solid results for a people who were hungry for justice.

Continue reading

Who is Georgia protecting by killing Troy Davis?

By Rady Ananda

Former Georgia Governor and US President, Jimmy Carter, along with former FBI Director, William S. Sessions, among a cast of thousands, have all demanded clemency for Troy Davis, who was convicted of the 1989 shooting death of Savannah, Georgia police officer, Mark Allen MacPhail, Sr.

Sept. 21 UPDATE: Troy Davis was murdered by the State of Georgia at 11:08 ET.

The Parole Board refuses to budge, despite conflicting evidence, including recanted testimony obtained under coercion, and the accusation by ten different people that Sylvester Coles was the shooter.

Though he maintains his innocence, Davis is set to be executed on Wednesday, Sept. 21 at 7 pm EDT. Georgia state senator Vincent Fort (D-Atlanta) has called for a strike by staffers at the prison where the execution is scheduled.

Continue reading

Former FBI director: Troy Davis should not be executed

Former FBI Director is calling on the state of Georgia to halt the execution of death row inmate Troy Davis.

By William S. Sessions
Atlanta Journal-Constitution

As Troy Davis faces his fourth execution date on Sept. 21, many may assume that lingering doubts about the case have been resolved. This is far from true, and the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles — which has several new members since the Davis case last crossed its desks — has the daunting task of reviewing one of the most controversial cases the state has ever seen.

What quickly will become apparent is that serious questions about Davis’ guilt, highlighted by witness recantations, allegations of police coercion and a lack of relevant physical evidence, continue to plague his conviction. Last summer, an extraordinary hearing ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court to answer these questions instead left us with more doubt.

Continue reading

Troy Davis and the Politics of Death

By Amy Goodman
Truth Dig

Death brings cheers these days in America. In the most recent Republican presidential debate in Tampa, Fla., when CNN’s Wolf Blitzer asked, hypothetically, if a man who chose to carry no medical insurance, then was stricken with a grave illness, should be left to die, cheers of “Yeah!” filled the hall. When, in the prior debate, Gov. Rick Perry was asked about his enthusiastic use of the death penalty in Texas, the crowd erupted into sustained applause and cheers. The reaction from the audience prompted debate moderator Brian Williams of NBC News to follow up with the question, “What do you make of that dynamic that just happened here, the mention of the execution of 234 people drew applause?”

That “dynamic” is why challenging the death sentence to be carried out against Troy Davis by the state of Georgia on Sept. 21 is so important. Davis has been on Georgia’s death row for close to 20 years after being convicted of killing off-duty police officer Mark MacPhail in Savannah. Since his conviction, seven of the nine nonpolice witnesses have recanted their testimony, alleging police coercion and intimidation in obtaining the testimony. There is no physical evidence linking Davis to the murder.

Continue reading