Tag Archives: zelaya

Reflections from after the Coup: Letter from Honduras

By Jimena Paz

Two years ago today, the president of my country, Manuel Zelaya, was forced at gunpoint onto a plane in an SOA graduate-led coup.  As Zelaya flew away, the integrity of Honduran sovereignty and democracy disappeared with him, but left behind on the ground was the resolve of my people to struggle to get it back.  This determination quickly exploded into what is now the Popular Resistance Front of Honduras.

Until that morning two years ago, I had never taken part in a demonstration on the street. All that changed on the morning of June 28th as I joined together with people I had never known – members of the LGBT community, Afro-Hondurans, indigenous leaders, and campesinos – to recover our stolen democracy.

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Honduras Freedom Ride: Video of Zelaya’s Return

By Lisa Sullivan
School of the Americas Watch

This past Saturday, Fr. Roy Bourgeois and I accompanied President Manuel Zelaya back to his native Honduras, almost two years after a military coup led by SOA graduates removed him from his country at gunpoint. The short flight
we took with him, from Managua to Tegucigalpa, was a journey packed with laughter, tears, songs, nerves, hugs, and decades of history.

Above all, this was an epic Latin American journey, a brief Latin American freedom ride of sorts. It was a moment to display to a world that does not often look this way, a loosely woven cloth of Latin American sovereignty and integration. As the only U.S. citizens invited to be part of a small group of international accompaniment, Roy and I felt extraordinarily privileged to be sharing this moment with our Latin American sisters and brothers.

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Amid bloody repression, Zelayas returns to Honduras

Porfirio Lobo and Manuel Zelaya shake hands on May 23, 2011 (Guardian UK)

By Rady Ananda

Since Obama’s first coup on June 28, 2009, when Honduras President Manuel Zelaya was kidnapped and flown to a U.S. military base in Palmerola before being spirited out of the country in his pajamas, Honduras has endured lethal repression under the US-installed dictator, Porfirio Lobo. But today, May 28, 2011, Zelaya returned.

On May 23rd, Colombia president Juan Manuel Santos and Venezuela president Hugo Chavez brokered a deal that allowed Zelaya to return so that Honduras will be readmitted to the Organisation of American States, thus gaining access to international “aid” funds.

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Crisis in Honduras: 100 Days of Resistance

Avi Lewis traveled to Honduras only days after Zelaya smuggled himself into the country and only 100 days after the country experienced only the second coup in Central America since the end of the Cold War. In this 24-minute Fault Lines program for Al Jazeera English, he chronicles how social movements are mobilizing in the streets, standing up to repression not just to bring their president back, but to re-found their nation on more equal terms.

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Zelaya calls for Honduras election boycott

honduras-resistance-latuff (250 x 182)By School of the Americas Watch

SOA Watch is extremely concerned about the situation in Honduras, where SOA graduates overthrew the democratically elected government on June 28, 2009. An agreement that was brokered last week between representatives of President Zelaya and the coup regime was supposed to “return the holder of executive power to its pre-June 28 state” but it turns out it was just another stalling tactic by the coup regime. Read a statement from Honduran President Manuel Zelaya below.

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Mossad implicated in Honduran coup

Honduras Coup tank

Reports are surfacing that Mossad was involved with the Honduran coup.  I’ve been told that it has been reported on CNN, but I couldn’t find a link so far.  And Wayne Madsen reveals the wild exaggerations that are being circulated in hopes of burying the story.

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Spiegel interview with President Zelaya: ‘We will not be brought to our knees’

 

 

Protesters hold a banner that reads " Coup Leaders Out, Honduras Resist", in support of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya  , as they commemorate the 1975 student massacre in San Salvador, July 30, 2009. About 1000 students marched in remembrance of a massacre in 1975 when government troops killed 20 students, and as many as 80 students disappeared. REUTERS/Luis Galdamez

Protesters hold a banner that reads " Coup Leaders Out, Honduras Resist", in support of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya , as they commemorate the 1975 student massacre in San Salvador, July 30, 2009. About 1000 students marched in remembrance of a massacre in 1975 when government troops killed 20 students, and as many as 80 students disappeared. REUTERS/Luis Galdamez

 

In a SPIEGEL interview, ousted President Manuel Zelaya, 56, discusses the coup in his native Honduras, the lack of intervention from Washington, his political ties to Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and his hopes to unseat the regime by peaceful means.

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